Loading...

One might think that our general knowledge of learning disabilities and their impact on children and adults would be better understood today. After all, research studies and recent advancements in our ability to study brain activity have confirmed the reality of learning disabilities. Yet many people continue to think that individuals with learning disabilities could do whatever was asked if they just tried ‘harder.’

Learning disabilities are complex and difficult to understand. For those of us who have never struggled to read, write down our thoughts or solve a math problem, it is almost impossible to imagine that tasks we accomplish easily could be so challenging for someone else. The problem is further compounded because learning disabilities have an almost invisible quality.

On Springer’s website, the following definition appears: A learning disability is a neurological condition that interferes with the ability to acquire, process, store, or produce information. It creates a significant discrepancy between an individual's intellectual potential and his/her success with any of the following: listening, speaking, reading, writing, reasoning, and mathematics. Throughout the individual's life, the condition may also affect emotional well-being, interpersonal relationships, daily living activities, and vocational performance. Learning disabilities cannot be attributed to other difficulties such as physical disabilities, mental retardation, emotional or behavioral disorders, or environmental factors. This definition is consistent with the definition for ‘specific learning disability’ in the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. 

It is important for families and teachers of students who are struggling to understand a few things about learning disabilities:

  • Scientists have proven that learning disabilities are real by studying the brain.
  • People with learning disabilities have average to superior ability, but their minds process information differently.
  • If a learning disability is not addressed, it can seriously interfere with a person’s success in school and in life.
  • Learning disabilities are a lifespan issue; many people still think that learning disabilities only impact school-aged individuals. 

Of course, not all students who struggle in school have a learning disability, but considering the “invisible” nature of the disability, it is best if everyone involved is well informed.

Blogger Shelly Weisbacher has been with Springer since 1987 and is in her 19th year as Executive Director.

Comments

  • Alt
    Wed, 05/11/2016 - 9:05pm reply

    Hello my name is Laticia my daughter is Shikiya she is 7 and is currently in 1st grade and will be repeating 1st grade. I believe she dose have a learning disability but the Dr and teacher can't come to an agreement and I was wondering if u could help

  • Alt
    Wed, 05/11/2016 - 9:05pm reply

    Hello my name is Laticia my daughter is Shikiya she is 7 and is currently in 1st grade and will be repeating 1st grade. I believe she dose have a learning disability but the Dr and teacher can't come to an agreement and I was wondering if u could help

  • Alt
    Thu, 07/14/2016 - 8:41am reply

    Laticia,

    Our apologies for the very late reply.  We did some work to the website in April, and your comment did not show up immediately.

    It's not too late for advice for the 2016-2017 school year.  Please contact Dr. Mary Ann Mulcahey at 513 871-6080 ext. 403 or email her at mmulcahey@springer-ld.org

     

Leave a Comment