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Blog - Insight into LD

19Sep

You have received one of those dreaded reports from school that your student in a grade from K through 3 is not meeting the curriculum standard in reading. You immediately blame yourself for not reading to them enough, for having a job, or worse, you blame your child for “not working hard enough.” Let’s take a step away from blame and toward what this report means for your child.

12Sep

Dyslexia is a language-based learning disability. Dyslexia can appear as a challenge in decoding unfamiliar words, spelling, using correct grammar, understanding and using language to express oneself verbally, writing, or in a slow reading or writing pace.

29Aug

About 80 percent of students on an Individual Education Plan (IEP) under the category of Specific Learning Disability have a reading disability. The International Dyslexia Association defines dyslexia as “a specific learning disability that is neurobiological in origin.

22Aug

Modern technology has made our lives so much easier. We can communicate quickly with someone through text or a one-sentence email. We can dictate reports instead of using the keyboard. Our children can look up solutions to math problems and watch someone work the problem online, read original newspaper accounts of historical events or do research on a topic for an essay.

15Aug

Parents and students always feel a bit nervous about the start of a new school year. Our children look forward to reconnecting with friends, getting new clothes and being with new teachers. At the same time they may be concerned about riding the bus for the first time, entering a new classroom or transitioning to a new school.

08Aug

You probably remember this commercial for the office supply store. In the background you heard the song “It’s the most wonderful time of the year.” Parents are skipping while pushing the shopping cart through the store. The children walk slowly behind them looking sad. It is the beginning of a new school year.

01Aug

We are three weeks away from the start of school in some districts in our community. Our kids have been playing video games, binge watching Netflix, having sleepovers and generally going to bed late and getting up late for weeks. What will happen when they have to get up at 6:30 or 7:00 on the first day of school? It won’t be pretty, as they say. Nothing like a cranky child to get the day off to a good start! 

25Jul

Crunch time is now, for students who have summer books to read or math worksheets to finish. Your student with LD/ADHD or executive function challenges might be waiting for the last minute to get going on summer work. Parents are worried and anxious; the student is less so. Rather than threatening the student with loss of privileges or bad grades, try another tactic.

30May

We recently had the pleasure of welcoming Lisa K. Woodruff, Springer alumni parent, to talk with a group of moms at a parent program called “An Evening for Moms with ADHD: Small Steps Toward a More Peaceful Home.” Lisa is the author of “How ADHD Affects Home Organization” and has a website: organize365.com.

03May

How will this summer go for your children? Now is the time to begin thinking and planning ahead to ensure that your student has adequate supervision and structure this summer.

There are several ways to get information on the variety of activities and summer experiences available in your community. Ask teachers, neighbors, check out the “Y,” your school district, the local recreation commission and universities to see what is available.